Tuesday, June 11, 2019

Chris Winter, 2JJ and Triple J legend, has died

Chris Winter was a legend in Australian radio. I remember listening to 2JJ on skip in Melbourne in the evenings. He had a deep bass voice, a nickname was "three balls", and he could use that voice to great effect.

In my early 20s I visited Sydney and turned up at the 2JJ studio up William street, I didn't meet Chris then but other staff welcomed me and showed me around.

Much later I was working in ABC training and he attended a course on mainframe word-processing on Dec Vax computers. He said he thought I'd be good on radio and invited me to the studio. From there I was a regular guest for a while on Triple J with Stuart Matchett. We remained friends and he was always right up to date with technology and the issues it triggers in society.

The photo above was taken when Rob Garnsey and I visited his home in Bronte in 2016. I saw from some social media posts that he'd been unwell but it's a shock that we lost him.

The last instagram post is from Winter Feast at Dark Mofo in June.



Old days: that hair!



Looks like his Twitter account has stopped. He tweeted a selfie in hospital recently and I asked if he was ok.


Farewell CW.


1 comment:

RCL said...

Wow, haven't lived in Oz since '77 and haven't heard of Chris Winter since. Was just reading some stuff on how the Nazis were financed and I remembered Chris doing a programme on JJ about how General Motors subsidiary Opel had allowed the Nazi war machine to obtain fuel for internal combustion from coal, and how GM was getting profits paid through Switzerland,and much more. Then I Google his name and find he died this very day!

Loved JJ soooo much. A radio station with REAL music that reflected what was being listened to in rages throughout Melbourne. And I liked Room to Move, with Chris doing way out programmes on stuff like rambetica which I had never even heard of, and have rarely heard of since. These were halcyon days.

A true great, by any standards. A real asset to any radio station that took popular music seriously as a cultural asset.